Humility Begins with Not My Will

In Daily Devotional by Will Walker and Kendal Haug

Theme of the Week: Learning Humility

Bible Verse: “Who, existing in the form of God, did not consider equality with God as something to be exploited. Instead he emptied himself by assuming the form of a servant, taking on the likeness of humanity. And when he had come as a man, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death— even to death on a cross.” Philippians 2:6-8 CSB

Scripture Reading: Mark 10:32-34

From beginning to end, Jesus’ life on earth was marked by humility. Jesus “emptied himself.” This is not to say he became something less than God in his humanity, “for in him the whole fullness of deity dwells bodily” (Colossians 2:9). It is to say that he became human, laying down his glorious form to take up a body of flesh. An incomparable condescension.

Why would the Son of God give up his seat at the right hand of the Father for a place at the table with sinners and tax collectors? He did it for us: “The Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many” (Mark 10:45). “Though he was rich, yet for your sake he became poor, so that you by his poverty might become rich” (2 Corinthians 8:9).

Jesus “humbled himself.” The emphasis is on obedience to the will of the Father, which was the death of his Son on a cross. An unbearable thought. But it is in his obedience that we see his humility. The night before his crucifixion, Jesus “began to be greatly distressed and troubled. And he said to them [the disciples], ‘My soul is very sorrowful, even to death.’ Remain here and watch. And going a little farther, he fell on the ground and prayed that, if it were possible, the hour might pass from him. And he said, ‘Abba, Father, all things are possible for you. Remove this cup from me'” (Mark 14:33–36).

The “cup” is Old Testament imagery for the outpouring of God’s righteous wrath. Jesus, in the garden, acknowledges what is to come on the cross, where he will take upon himself God’s judgment against the sin of the world.

The thought of drinking the cup in full was so dreadful that Jesus asked if there was any way to avoid it. He went to God like a little child who believes that Dad is able to get him out of whatever difficulty he’s in. Jesus asked, “Dad, you can do anything … can you take this cup from me?” For Jesus’ whole life, whenever he turned to the Father in prayer, he found comfort and strength. All the light and love of heaven flooded his soul. This time he turns to the Father and “finds hell rather than heaven opened up before him.”

It was sorrow unto death. When you see that the mere taste of the cup was enough to throw the Son into this kind of pain, then you are ready in this season to consider what the full experience on the cross must have been like for him. You can begin to understand the depth of humility that says, “Yet not what I will, but what you will” (Mark 14:36).


Taken from Journey to the Cross: Devotions for Lent, by Will Walker and Kendal Haug, ©2017.
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About
Will Walker and Kendal Haug
Will Walker is the lead pastor and church planter of Providence Church in Austin, TX. He is the coauthor of several books. Will and his wife Debbie have two children. Kendal Haug is one of the founding pastors of Providence Church in Austin, TX. He leads the church in liturgical formation and direction, and he oversees the community of musicians that make up Providence Music. Kendal and his wife Ashley have two daughters, Ruby and Frances.
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Will Walker and Kendal Haug
Will Walker is the lead pastor and church planter of Providence Church in Austin, TX. He is the coauthor of several books. Will and his wife Debbie have two children. Kendal Haug is one of the founding pastors of Providence Church in Austin, TX. He leads the church in liturgical formation and direction, and he oversees the community of musicians that make up Providence Music. Kendal and his wife Ashley have two daughters, Ruby and Frances.